Sunday, February 4, 2018

The Randomness of my World

I just finished reading Agenda 21.  I won't give it a full review.  I will say that it was clearly a book with an agenda (ha! ha!).  The goal of the book was to draw attention to the UN initiative (called Agenda 21) that will substantially limit individual freedoms, especially with regard to private ownership of land.

Then, FB gave me this gem. 

Not all of it is true.  Permission means that we are required to be given consent to act.  Many of the items on that list require no consent.  

For example, here in Maine, I am still able to own land (not without government involvement, which isn't the same as granting permission.  If I have the money to pay for it, I can call it mine), and with only a few exceptions, I can do what I want with my land.  

I can drive my unregistered car as an unlicensed driver on my own property - without permission.  I just can't drive an unregistered, uninsured car as an unlicensed driver on government-built roads.  That's fair.  

If I own enough of it, I can hunt on my land without a license.  If I hunt with a bow, I don't even have to tell anyone that I'm hunting.  It's no one's business.  Likewise, if I have a stocked pond on my land, I can go fishing ... without a license.   If I'm not, yet, 16, I don't even need a pond to fish without a license.

Depending on the business and where it is located, one does not need permission.  I owned and operated a virtual office service for eighteen years.  I didn't need a license.  

I have never asked for nor been given permission to cross the road.

I do not need permission to collect rainwater.

The fact is that we don't need "permission" for several of the items listed.  Like getting married.  In order to have one's "marriage" recognized by the State for the purposes of filing taxes, receiving social security for dependents, or being eligible for spousal employer benefits, we need to file a legal document called a marriage license, but I can live with someone, in the way that a husband and wife live together (share a house and a bed, have children, adopt dogs, grocery shop together, and essentially build a life as a couple), and it's not illegal.  I won't go to jail.  So, in that respect, I don't need permission.  I only need a license when it comes to receiving support and benefits from the government.  I'm completely free to not accept those benefits and completely free to live with anyone I wish as that person's "wife."  In fact, in some States, the permission thing is so *not* needed that if one can prove that one lived with another person for a specified period of time as a spouse, there's no marriage ceremony or license required.  It's called "Common Law Marriage."  

Memes like the one pictured might be helpful to point out that the government is pretty pervasive and invasive in our lives, but there's also some degree of fear-mongering propaganda - which is not usually very useful.

We have a great deal of freedom, but with that freedom also comes responsibility.  We can't demand that we be allowed to do what we wish, but then require that the government fix it for us when things go bad. We don't get it both ways.

The Maine legislature introduced a bill to prohibit any laws being passed, here in Maine, that supported the Agenda 21 initiative.  That's interesting. 


Today, here in the US, millions of people will be watching a football game.  I've been asked several times this week about my intentions regarding the game.  I actually thought it had already been played.  Isn't the Super Bowl on Thanksgiving weekend?  Apparently, not.

Twice this weekend, when someone asked me about watching something, I was able to give my stock answer, "I don't have a television."  

I've read dozens of articles recently about how millennials are getting rid of their cable bills and their televisions, and I have so many regular readers who've been TV-Free longer than I have.  So it still surprises me when people are surprised that I don't have a television.

Like this:

Guy:  Hey did you see that commercial with the guy that looks like your husband?
Me:  I don't have a television.
Guy (visibly shaken):  You ... don't have a TV?  How ...?  What ...?  I don't have cable, but I couldn't ... no TV?
Me:  I have Netflix ... and Amazon Prime.  It's not like I live in a cave.

And then:

Guy:  So are you ready for the Super Bowl?
Me:  I don't have a television.
Guy:  *stunned silence*

I sure know how to kill a conversation.  


I was reading an article this morning about a kid in Puerto Rico who started a campaign to provide solar lighting to people who are still without electricity after Hurricane Harvey last fall.  

 My first thought is that it's a cool thing this kid is doing.

But ....

When we had our very-short-by-comparison, power outage last year, my area of least preparedness turned out to be lighting.  I fixed that.  We have all sorts of solar lights, now, and solar chargers for our electronics.  

And I was annoyed that it is so important to us to have lights.  

My second reaction is to be disappointed with the tone of the article, which implies that people can't survive without electricity.

Millions of years of human evolution.  Less than two centuries of having electricity.  How did we grow so weak that we can't survive without lights at night time and access to ice cream whenever we want it?    

The reality is that they have survived - for FOUR months - without electricity.  They've survived.  They're living.

I hope one of the "survivors" will write a book ... or at least a few great articles ... about how to survive for the long-haul after a major disaster.


I found this book at the library.   For those who don't want to click-through to the Amazon link, it's called "Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes."   The story of Cassandra is that she was both gifted with the ability to see into the future and know what would happen, but she was cursed with the inability to get people to listen to her.  So, she was a prophet to which no one cared to listen, and her warnings went unheeded.

The authors of the linked book state that we have modern Cassandras.  People who know what is about to happen, but fail to convince the masses about what's coming, and it's always too late.  

The book is divided into two sections.  Section One discusses the catastrophes in the past that could have been avoided, if we had listened to our Cassandra.

Section two outlines the possible events in our near future and the Cassandras who are trying to warn us.  This is the section I'm most interested in reading.  What does this author believe are the REAL threats to our safety and personal freedom?  A quick scan of the table of contents was interesting.  Anthrax and AIs are two of the first topics. 


It's a rainy, cold day here in Maine.  I'm slow-cooking a pork roast in the Dutch Oven on the top of the wood stove.  When it's done, I may make it into pulled pork sandwiches.

Deus Ex Machina and I split some wood earlier, and he's now a nap in the wing-backed chair.  I hear music practice from somewhere in my house.  It's a lazy afternoon.

I'll bet pulled pork sandwiches are considered Super Bowl food.  

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