Monday, February 26, 2018

Store More Than You Think You'll Need

A few years ago, Deus Ex Machina and I watched the historical reenactment reality television series Frontier House.

The useful thing - for Preppers - about this sort of show is that it can give us an idea of ways we can make our lives more low-impact and less dependent.  Back in those days, for instance, there were no grocery stores to fall back on.  There was no heating oil truck to deliver one's winter's supply of heating fuel.  There was no electricity to provide lighting for evening tasks or Yankee Candle in the mall.  There was no mall.

Given people's attitudes when the electricity is interrupted during bad weather, it's kind of amazing that humans managed to survive without modern amenities.

But we did.

These days, though, we really don't have much of a clue as to what it takes to really survive for the long haul without all of those safety nets.


As I've mentioned, probably a billion times, we heat with wood.  The last heating oil delivery we had was almost ten years ago - in the early spring 2008.  There have been times over the years when the night-time temperatures plummeted and the furnace (set at its lowest setting - 50°) kicked on in the middle of that cold, COLD night.  This year was the first year that the furnace never kicked on.  In fact, I'm not sure the furnace even works anymore, although the oil tank reads that there's still a little oil in there.

Two years ago, we were very fortunate when a family member allowed us access to his property to harvest our wood supply - for free.  So, while in the previous years, we spent a lot of our summers finding free wood on Craigslist, and such, from people who had, what they believed to be, a substantial amount of firewood, but which, almost invariably, ended up being, maybe, a week's worth of heat for us, we also ended up having to purchase a cord here or a cord there.  This year, we didn't buy any.



In fact, luckily for us, we also harvested enough of what Deus Ex Machina calls "early season wood" to do our sugaring.  The early season stuff is mostly dead fall - branches or standing dead wood, little saplings that were competed out and died still standing.  We still have a third of what we originally harvested - enough to boil another quart or two of maple sap to syrup.

The thing is, though, that we're nearly out of wood.  We may have enough to get us through the rest of the cold days, but we'll be cutting it close.

Back to that documentary ... when those families were out in that wilderness, their goal was to discover how it would have been to live on the Montana Frontier - basically, without any help.  They, also, heated (and cooked) with wood, and the experts told them that whenever they had any free time, they should be chopping wood - that the amount of wood they would need for heating and cooking through the winter would be more than they could imagine.  It might look like a lot - all stacked neat in perfect cords at the end of the summer, but they would be surprised at how fast it went when it was too snowy to get more.

Last fall, when we were still harvesting our winter supply, one bright, sunny day, Deus Ex Machina and I were out in the yard stacking and splitting wood.  A stranger walked up to us and expressed his awe at how much wood we had.  We mentioned that we heated with wood.  To which he replied, "You won't use all of that, though?"



Well, actually, yes, depending on how cold it gets, we'll use nearly every stick of that impressive amount of heating fuel, and unfortunately, maybe even a little more.  Finding dry firewood in February ... yeah, not happening.

It's interesting, to me, how little we modern folk understand of how much it takes to keep us alive and comfortable.

Deus Ex Machina knows.  And this summer, when he's pushing me and the girls to work harder at harvesting our winter fuel supply, I'll try to remember that it always takes more than we think it will.  Better to have too much than too little.

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