Monday, October 20, 2014

Good Supplies to Have ... Another List



I frequently link to the 100 Items to Disappear First list. In fact, this post is the sixth post with the link. I'm probably posting it once a year, at this point.

The list was written by a war survivor, and it is things that they found became scarce quickly when supply lines are severed. I've always kept that list in mind when considering what things I want to have in my house.

There was a time when I would get really stressed out about what I didn't have, about gaps in my storing of the things on the list, and when that started happening with too great a frequency, I started to look at the list differently. Instead of trying to ensure that I have all of the things - in quantity - that are on the list, I started to think about alternatives. Like can openers. I have a can opener, even though I don't buy much canned food from the grocery store anymore, but I also have this handy little tool called a P-38. It's on my keychain. It's a manual can opener.

Other things I've just decided that I don't need, anyway, and I've learned to live without them. Like paper towels. I, actually, stopped using paper towels back before it became the "green" thing to do, because I hated the waste and the expense. We use cloth napkins at the dinner table, and we use cloth washcloths and towels in the kitchen. I repurpose old towels for rags that are used for wiping up spills and other cleaning tasks.

I also learned to make cloth feminine hygiene products, and I actually use them (I know, TMI. Sorry about that). We haven't made the leap into cloth toilet wipes, yet, but in a worst case scenario, we have plenty of old, too-stained-or-ripped-for-Goodwill clothes that can (and will) be repurposed.

I repost the 100 Items list frequently, but I also enjoy looking at other lists. This one of 50 Items You Forgot to Buy is a good, concise list. I like the explanation of why the author feels that each item should be stored. There are some pretty practical suggestions, several of which I also recommend in my book. Like books, games and musical instruments.

We have 37 of the 50 recommended items, but some of the items I just won't ever have.

I don't have, nor do I recommend, instant coffee. The reason the author recommends instant coffee is the possibility that the coffee maker won't work, but my family doesn't use a coffee maker. We use a French Press, and so, as long as I have hot water, I have brewed coffee.

My bigger concern would be not having coffee at all, because, where I live, coffee is always, and will always be, an import. Coffee beans don't grow in my climate.

Remember, I mentioned that these lists prompted me to think of alternatives? There is an alternative to coffee - at least with regard to taste - and it is available to me ... and most people that I know. Roasted dandelion root does, really, taste like coffee - without the caffeine. Dandelion is incredibly healthful, too, and if one is already drinking decaf coffee, switching will lose one none of the flavor, but will gain one all of the health boost.

The one thing I do like about the lists is that it's not just about prepping. Some of the recommendations are just good things to have on hand anyway, because they're things we often use on a regular basis. Getting an extra at the grocery store doesn't cost a lot and doesn't take up a lot of space.

From a preparedness point of view, I didn't actually understand the umbrella, but I don't really think it's a bad thing to have. Not really. It's practical and can be useful, and really, it doesn't take up much space. So, why not?

Eventually, we'll run out of the consumables on the lists, but things like the musical instruments, which my family already plays, the board games and the books - we won't, ever, use those up, and even without TEOTWAWKI, having them does make our life nicer.

I should also add that sometimes the alternative is not to change the thing, but rather to change how we acquire it. Like, maybe, it's not something one has to buy, but something one can make ... like the checkers board pictured above. I made the board using an old piece of plywood and a sharpie marker. The pieces are painted lids. No one ever said that we had to spend money on all of our supplies. Creativity is definitely welcome ... and encouraged :).

Based on the 50 Items list, how prepared are you?


1 comment:

  1. Interesting list. I've read some of this before, and did better than I thought I would. My gap is not having another heat source (woodstove) but I'm working on hubby or possibly enough water stored (another rain barrel).

    ReplyDelete