Monday, May 16, 2011

Eating the Lawn

The other day while Deus Ex Machina was burning cooking a chicken on the grill, I went out with my kitchen shears and started harvesting some greens for dinner.

At this point, my garden is still a little ... erm ... sparse, but that doesn't mean there aren't plenty of things around my yard that we can eat with our (home-grown) chicken.



Just FYI: batter-fried dandelion flowers are all that ... and way better than a bag of chips!

My recipe:

1 c fully opened dandelion flowers
1/4 c corn meal flour
2 eggs
salt/pepper to taste
oil or lard to about 1/2" deep in pan (the flowers will need to be at least half immersed in the hot oil to "deep fry")

Wash and drain dandelion flowers and pick off any of the stem. Mix corn flour, eggs, and seasonings in a bowl to make a thick batter. Dredge flower heads in the batter giving them a very thick coating. Drop in hot oil. Turn, if necessary, to cook on other side. Serve 'em while they're hot ;).

I had batter left over, and I fried it plain. I could have added some diced onion to the mix, too, to give it a more southern (as in hush puppies) flair, but it was good as it was.

We had the greens sauted with chives and butter. Oh ... my ... can I just say, YUM!

The good part about eating dandelions is that they are a quick, easy, and delicious side dish.

The better part is that they are chock full of of healthy stuff, and even with the butter and the batter, are still a high-powered vitamin and mineral punch.

The best part? They're free, and so prolific that they can be found just about every where one looks.

Enjoy!

And if you see a few seed heads forming, don't forget to share the wealth ... your neighbors will appreciate your efforts in planting next spring's crop ... and if they don't, you can offer to come and dig that pesky weed for them, and then, invite them to dinner - sauted dandelion greens in scrambled eggs, fried corn cakes with maple syrup, and batter-fried dandelion heads.

Edited to add: Many thanks to Pappy, from the Kentucky Preppers, for the great review of my book. I'm really glad you found something useful to you ;).

And also to Barefoot in the Garden, who won a copy during my Twenty-One Day giveaway.

And speaking of, with one exception (Sorry, Mrs. D, your oil lamp is on its way soon - promise - there's a matter of finding the proper packaging ;), if you entered a comment during the Twenty-one days and were chosen as a winner, but you haven't received your item, it's either on its way to you or not sent, because I didn't get your address. Please check to see if you were a winner and leave a comment with your contact information. I won't publish any comments with personal information.

If anyone is interested in ordering a copy of my book from me, I still have a few copies available. Use the PayPal link on the side bar.

4 comments:

  1. I'm trying to explore more edible wild plants. Not doing so well yet. I tried common mallow this week. Like other things I've tried (prickly pear pads, for example), it falls into the category of "I'd eat it if we were starving to death." Otherwise, um, no.

    I have not tried dandelion flowers. The leaves are okay if mixed with other greens that aren't so strong.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a recipe for dandelion cookies somewhere. I only hesitate to harvest them because we honestly don't have any in our yard and I don't trust anywhere else due to the amount of pesticides/insecticides people put on their lawns.
    But yours do look good!

    ReplyDelete
  3. We're getting overrun with prickly lettuce this year. A little experimentation suggests that the leaves will make good salad greens if picked off a younger plant. The ones that are already three feet tall? The leaves are bitter. I'm going to try making a salad this weekend from that and wild garlic.

    The plant supposedly has some medicinal properties as well, although some of those properties are disputed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If there were only dandelions in my yard. Still trying to see the house in Florida.

    ReplyDelete