Tuesday, December 14, 2010

External Validation

HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA!

Oh, uh ... ugh! umpf!

Sorry about that. I was rolling-on-the-floor-laughing-my-ass-off.

What has me all giddy at the moment is the ruling by a Virginia judge regarding the recent Health Care Reform Act that was passed by Congress. He says, and I quote: "Neither the Supreme Court nor any federal circuit court of appeals has extended Commerce Clause powers to compel an individual to involuntarily enter the stream of commerce by purchasing a commodity in the private market."

Finally!

Someone with some damned sense!

And it's what I said from the very beginning, that the government does not have the right to force us to pay for private health insurance.

External validation is a good thing.

But what's galling is that it's taken so damned long for someone in a position of authority to come forward and state the obvious.

I can't wait to see where this goes.

7 comments:

  1. This is GREAT news. I'm laughing out loud too!!! It is about time someone with authority finally said it!! I agree with you so much.

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  2. I agree that the government should not be able to force an individual to purchase a commodity in the private market...yet for years the government has done so. For example, car insurance is required in most, if not all, states. And in my hometown, not having electrical service meant you were automatically investigated by Child Protective Services for child neglect. I'm sure other "private market" commodities are required in other states and cities.

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  3. Very good points, particialynn, but I've always looked at those things differntly.

    With regard to the eletricity, there is no federal law requiring that we electrify our houses. That's a requirement of your specific community, and only if you have kids, right? Not to sound flippant or over-simplify the issue, but the fact is that you don't have to live in that community. Also, while we think of self-generated power options as being new, they're not. They've been around for a long time. My parents were looking at off-grid, solar-powered houses back in the '70s. At very least, emergency generators have been around for a very long time, and while I wouldn't want to power my house with a generator 100% of the time, it's a possibility that would allow me to not have to purchase power from the national grid.

    As for auto insurance, it's only a requirment if you have a car. And the government has never said that we all must have a car.

    The thing that makes those two examples different, for me, is that I have other options that don't require me to spend money on a commodity for the rest of my life. I can do without a car, and I can make my own electricity, but I can't *not* have a body, and the way the law was written every body living in the US would be required *by law* to have health insurance coverage with most people being covered by private health insurance companies.

    But, if it is, as you say, and the government is forcing us to purchase private commodities, we should really start pushing back, as it is not within their power to do so.

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  4. Good points - I'll give the matter a bit more thought.

    ...and it kind made me chuckle, because I DID move out of that community, and I have never in my life owned a car. Not having a car made grocery shopping interesting when I was a single mother of three, but that's another story entirely.

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  5. I can relate to having no car. I've spent a lot of my life without a car or with only one car, which my husband took to work, and I know it can be very inconvenient, especially if one lives, where I have for most of my life, out in the suburbs :).

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  6. I used to have my dad come over once a week to watch my kids (usually during naptime). While he babysat, I would use my bike with a child trailer to get groceries.

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  7. I was very happy to see this ruling also; let's just hope it holds up and spreads.

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